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Germans, Brazilians, Farviewians, and Pirates

Last summer we had a fellow working with us from northern Germany named Thies Winkelmann. Thies was a great worker and unfailingly cheerful. He loved to work hard and he loved to drink beer. He also loved to grill. Not just any kind of grilling, though, he loved Churasco. Churasco is a Brazilian style barbeque for which the meat must be brined at least a day in a tub filled with salt, onion, garlic, lemon, rosemary, bay leaves and assorted ground spices. Thies made Churasco for the farm crew several times during his summer here and would get excited just thinking about the succulent grilled meat. He gave us the recipe, but all the measurements were for 20lbs of meat, enough to feed 40 people! Of course, on our first attempt, we decided to double it.

The Fairview Feast is an event that we hold every summer here on the farm. Originally it was conceived because we’d joked about how much fun it would be to attend a medieval feast. Drinking from goblets, ripping into crusty loaves of bread and tender drumsticks, cheering loudly and making enthusiastic toasts and huzzahs, what more could you want from a meal? Our first year, we held the feast in August on a hill overlooking the farm. We slaughtered a goat the day before and spent all day roasting the meat, baking bread, and apple pies, and setting up tables and benches in our spot. After that The Feast became a tradition, each successive event more boisterous than the last. Each Feast also has a theme: medieval, roman, barbarian… This year we went with pirates. The Buccaneer Banquet.

Because it was such a busy summer for the crew, we decided to make The Feast a more low key event. It went down this past weekend without too much fanfare, but plenty of rousing cheers.  We stocked up meat from the employee boxes for several months and, on Thursday night, made enough Churasco brine for 40 lbs of meat. It sat in a big cooler in the fridge for two days and when we took it out to put on the grill, the aroma of rosemary and garlic were wonderfully strong.

I’m not an expert at the grill. I always seem to run the thing too hot and burn the meat, or else I keep too few coals and it takes forever. On Saturday though, it all came out perfectly. The meat had soaked for so long that it was tender and bursting with flavor. I’ve never been good at planning far enough ahead to marinate meat that I’m cooking for myself, but after tasting that Churasco, I know I’ll start. Even though it rained all day Saturday, we had a good crowd come out in their swashbuckling garb and we devoured all but a few pieces of the meat we prepared plus a variety of vegetable dishes that people brought and some good home brews. Folks from Fairview certainly know how to have a good time, even in the rain.

Here’s the recipe, though you may have to scale it down based on how many people you’re trying to feed. Truth is, I don’t think you’ll have any trouble getting rid of any leftovers!

Shiver me timbers!

Sweetbread

Honey Garlic & Lemon Pork Chops

Sweet, sour, savory, and a little spicy, this pork chop marinade/glaze is sure to please all members of the family!

Ingredients:
4 8 oz. HNG pasture rasied pork chops
1/4 cup honey
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 T lemon juice
1 T braggs liquid amino acids or soy sauce
1 t cayenne pepper (leave out the cayenne to keep the marinade mild)

Mix the honey, garlic, lemon juice, braggs/soy sauce, and cayenne. Add to pork chops and marinade in the fridge for 4+ hours.

Prepare your grill to medium high heat. Remove chops from marinade and place on the grill, baste chops 2-3 times with extra marinade while cooking. Grill for 15 minutes flipping once or until the internal temperature reaches 145 F.

 

Marinated Grilled Pork Tenderloin

Spring is here! Time to pull out the grill and try Charlie Palmer’s Marinated Grilled Pork Tenderloin Recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/saras-secrets/marinated-grilled-pork-tenderloin-recipe/index.html (courtesy of foodnetwork.com). This moist and flavorful cut of pasture raised pork is said to be the most tender piece from the whole hog! Try taking it off the grill just before it hits 155 degrees and let it finish cooking while it rests (5-10 minutes).